A news blog for Seattle's Phinney Ridge and Greenwood neighborhoods

 

Entries from November 2016

PNA Winter Festival & Crafts Fair is this weekend

November 30th, 2016 by Doree

The huge annual PNA Winter Festival & Crafts Fair is 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. both Saturday and Sunday at the Phinney Center, 6532 Phinney Ave. N., in both the Blue and Brick buildings. Admission is $2 for PNA members, $4 general. Please also bring non-perishable food for the food bank.

More than 100 hand-picked artists and crafts vendors will feature thousands of items for your holiday shopping. From hand-crafted clothing to furniture, jewelry, housewares, candles, spices, toys, art and more. Enjoy continuous live entertainment in both buildings, plus lunch items and baked goods.

Click here to see the full vendor list and entertainment schedule.

And click here to see photos of many of last year’s vendors, craft items and entertainers.

(Note: PhinneyWood is a Winter Festival sponsor.)

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Streamlined Design Review for 5 townhomes at 308 N. 74th St.

November 30th, 2016 by Doree

The Department of Construction and Inspections is conducting a Streamlined Design Review on development of the lot at 308 N. 74th St., just east of Bluebird Ice Cream and Café Vita. The small single-family home will be demolished and replaced with a three-story structure containing three townhouses, plus a three-story structure with two live/work units. Surface parking will be provided for three vehicles.

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Because the project is under Streamlined Design Review, the only opportunity to comment on the project is now through Dec. 11. Send comments regarding site planning and design issues to PRC@seattle.gov, and reference project #3025653.

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Design rendering by H+dIT Collaborative, LLC.

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Phinney Ridge Community Council meets Tuesday to discuss development, land use policy, homeless encampments, waste water

November 30th, 2016 by Doree

The Phinney Ridge Community Council meets at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 6, at the Phinney Neighborhood Center, 6532 Phinney Ave. N.

On the agenda:

  • Guest speaker Dana West, Planner for King County Waste Water Treatment Division
  • Project reports/permit updates for proposed developments at 6726 Greenwood Ave. N. and 7009 Greenwood Ave. N.
  • Land use policy reports on: Seattle Backyard Cottages legislation; Seattle Housing Affordability & Livability Agenda updates on Environmental Impact Statements for proposed height increases; Greenwood Phinney Urban Village Map for height/density upzones; discussion of site criteria for city’s Homeless Encampment proposed locations

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Earthquake Home Retrofit class at Broadview Library on Saturday

November 29th, 2016 by Doree

Seattle Office of Emergency Management is hosting an earthquake retrofit class at the Broadview Library, 12755 Greenwood Ave. N., from 1-3 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 3.

The workshop is free but online registration is required.

This introductory workshop will provide information on how to seismically secure a house to its foundation, especially for houses built before 1980. Experienced home retrofit instructors will teach attendees on what tools are needed to retrofit a house and will discuss building techniques, the city’s free plan set and the permit process. The workshop is designed for all homeowners, whether they’re doing the work themselves or hiring a qualified contractor.

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A prescription for managing seasonal depression

November 29th, 2016 by Doree

This is a sponsored post from UW Medicine.

With the days growing shorter and the skies darkening, the UW Neighborhood Ballard Clinic is starting to see patients whose moods match the gloomy weather. They are tired, sleep long hours and have trouble getting out of bed or leaving the house.

If these complaints sound familiar, they may mark the onset of winter seasonal affective disorder (SAD). This type of depression is thought to be caused by the effect of reduced natural daylight on brain chemicals that regulate our sleep patterns and mood.

Talk with your primary care provider if you’ve experienced SAD symptoms for several years. Once they’ve confirmed a diagnosis, they can discuss these common treatment options:

Light therapy
The first line of treatment for most people is light therapy. They sit in front of a light box that delivers high-intensity white fluorescent light for about 30 minutes a day. According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness, 50 to 80 percent of daily light box users experience an essentially complete remission of symptoms when they continue treatment into spring.

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The “dawn simulator” is another light therapy that can be used alone or in conjunction with a light box. This light mimics a natural sunrise. It turns on early in the morning and gradually increases in brightness to awaken people more naturally without an alarm.

Let your doctor know if your mood fails to improve after several weeks of light therapy. You should also see your doctor immediately if you have severe symptoms of seasonal depression, such as difficulty functioning at work or home, or if you are feeling unusually sad and blue. In these cases, more aggressive treatments using antidepressant medications and cognitive behavioral therapy may be necessary.

Diet and exercise
For seasonal affective disorder, as for other types of depression, the benefits of regular exercise and a healthy diet cannot be overemphasized. A daily walk is a great start. Or you can take advantage of the many opportunities for indoor and outdoor recreation that the Pacific Northwest offers year-round, like Ballard’s own Turkey Trot.

Finally, while many people find that these therapies – alone or in combination – can help to prevent or alleviate the symptoms of seasonal depression, some patients find that one other instruction is helpful at this time of the year. Along with shorter days, the arrival of fall often brings increased stress: summer vacations are over, school starts, and the holidays are around the corner. Enjoyable activities are needed to counter stress and keep our spirits up, so remember to have fun. We live in Ballard after all.

The UW Neighborhood Ballard Clinic is open six days a week, including evenings, and offers comprehensive patient- and family-centered primary care for the entire family throughout all stages of life. For more information about the UW Neighborhood Ballard Clinic and to make an appointment, visit uwmedicine.org/inballard or call 206.789.7777.

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Level 3 registered sex offender moves into Phinney/Fremont area

November 28th, 2016 by Doree

Seattle Police Department says a Level 3 registered sex offender recently moved into the south end of the neighborhood.

Kevin Houser moved to the 100 block of North 46 Street and is no longer under Department of Corrections supervision. According to the Washington Association of Sheriffs and Police Chiefs website, Houser was convicted in 2003 of first degree child molestation.

More info from SPD:

Level 3 sex offenders pose the highest risk to re-offend. It is normal to feel upset, angry and worried about a registered sex offender living in your community. The Community Notification Act of 1990 requires sex offenders to register in the community where they live. The law also allows local law enforcement to make the public aware about Level 2 and Level 3 offenders. As all of these offenders have completed their sentence, they are free to live where they wish. Experts believe sex offenders are less likely to re-offend if they live and work in an environment free of harassment. Any actions taken against the listed sex offenders could result in arrest and prosecution as it is against the law to use this information in any to threaten, intimidate or harass registered sex offenders. The SPD Sex Offender detectives will check on these offenders every 3 months to verify our information.

You can use 9-1-1 to report any and all suspicious activity.

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SPD provides tips to prevent car prowls while holiday shopping

November 28th, 2016 by Doree

Seattle Police Department North Precinct Crime Prevention Coordinator Mary Amberg provided the following tips to help prevent car prowls while shopping during the holidays.

In past years we have seen a rise in car prowls during the holiday season at the Northgate Mall. Seattle Police Department is dedicated to helping people stay safe during this time of year and will be increasing patrol and visibility in the Northgate Mall area. Please take the below precautions when parking at the mall.

Car prowls are crimes of opportunity that happen within seconds. Thieves are targeting all types of vehicles looking for recently purchased gifts, GPS devices, cell phones, purses, cash, laptops, cameras, luggage, and garage remotes. There are many things you can do to help prevent yourself from becoming a victim.

  • Carry your purchases with you while you shop. If that is impractical, place them in the trunk and move your car to another location in case a car prowler is observing the parking lot.
  • Remove all valuables from your vehicle every time you park, roll up windows, and lock your car.
  • Do not leave cords and charging devices in plain view, a prowler may see these and take the chance that you have a valuable electric inside and enter your car.
  • If valuables must be left behind, hide them out of sight or place them in the trunk before parking at your destination.
  • Disable internal trunk release per your owner’s manual instructions.
  • Park in well-lit and well-traveled areas if possible.
  • Audible alarms or other theft deterrent devices can be effective.
  • Remote controls for garages should never be left inside parked vehicles.

Most importantly BE OBSERVANT and report all crimes and suspicious activity to 911 immediately!!!

*IF YOUR VEHICLE IS BROKEN INTO*

You can file a report by calling the non-emergency number at 206-625-5011, or file one online at: http://www.seattle.gov/police/report/default.htm

When filing a report on-line or over the phone you do not need to remain at the scene. If you choose to call the non-emergency line, simply ask to report a crime and, if it meets the criteria, the call-taker will forward you to an officer who will take your report over the phone. The officer will still provide you with a case number. If the crime is still in progress or it is an emergency situation, call 9-1-1 immediately.

 

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Comments on environmental issues now being accepted for 949 N. 80th St. development

November 28th, 2016 by Doree

The Department and Construction and Inspections is now accepting comments on environmental concerns for the empty lot at 949 N. 80th St., which is planned to become a four-story building with 24 small efficiency dwelling units. Parking for six vehicles will be provided at grade level.

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Online comments on environmental issues will be accepted through Dec. 11. This may be the only opportunity to comment on the environmental impacts of this proposal.

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PNA GloCone lit up for the holidays

November 28th, 2016 by Doree

About 150 people braved the rain and cold Saturday night for the annual lighting of the GloCone suspended from the Phinney Center’s air raid tower, at the corner of Phinney Avenue North and North 67th Street.

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Attendees listened to holiday music and enjoyed treats while the GloCone and holiday LED monkeys were lit up. The monkeys are part of our neighborhood’s fairly new holiday light tradition, as an alternative to traditional holiday lights. Look for hundreds of the monkeys in business and residence windows throughout the neighborhood.

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And see the PNA Business Group’s MonkeyWood website for more holiday activities.

Thanks to Mike V for the photos!

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