A news blog for Seattle's Phinney Ridge and Greenwood neighborhoods

 

News roundup: volunteers and ambassadors wanted, recycle damaged used clothing, activating more public spaces

March 10th, 2015 · Comments

Here’s a roundup of various news from around the city.

The Crisis Clinic is looking for volunteers to:

  • Answer calls on the 24-Hour Crisis Line, WA Recovery Help Line, or WA Warm Line
  • Respond online via Crisis Chat
  • Supervise youth volunteers with Teen Link
  • Make quality assurance calls for King County 2-1-1

The Crisis Clinic, which is located near Northgate, provides training and supervision and a variety of schedules. Call 206-461-3210 ext. 697 or see the volunteer webpage.

You can now donate damaged used clothes, linens and shoes to be recycled through Threadcycle, a new program by King County and Seattle Public Utilities.

The Environmental Protection Agency estimates that the average person throws away 70 pounds of clothing per year; up to 95 percent of the used clothes, shoes and linens thrown in the garbage could have been reused or recycled.

Campaign partners who accept clothes, shoes and linens in any condition except wet, mildewed, or contaminated with hazardous materials are: Big Brothers Big Sisters of Puget Sound, Seattle Goodwill, Northwest Center, Salvation Army Family Thrift Stores, SightConnection, TexGreen, USAgain, and Value Village.

To learn more about Threadcycle, what items can be given for reuse or recycling, and where or how to donate, visit www.kingcounty.gov/threadcycle.

Seattle has just launched its new Parklet Program, where businesses and community groups can apply to create a tiny park or “streatery.” A parklet converts a couple of on-street parking spaces into public space (the city currently has six). Parklet hosts are responsible for all costs, including design, construction, and ongoing maintenance.

But what’s a “streatery,” you ask? Well, with the success of both sidewalk cafés and parklets in Seattle, we’re also rolling out “streateries,” a new type of seating in the street that combines the best of both worlds. Streateries, like parklets, are small open spaces constructed in a parking spot. And like sidewalk cafés, streateries provide outdoor seating for local businesses. Streateries provide a new option for activating a parklet in different ways throughout the day—sometimes as public space and sometimes as a café with table service. And streateries make it possible for businesses in areas with narrow sidewalks to have sidewalk cafés, too.

Our new Parklet Handbook tells you everything you need to know about designing, permitting, and building a parklet or streatery in Seattle. Applying to the program is easy! You need to submit an application form, three letters of support from your community (four if you want a streatery), a simple site plan showing the ideas for your parklet or streatery, and a few photos of the proposed location. Check out the application guidelines in the Parklet Handbook for all the details.

All application materials must be emailed to parklets@seattle.gov by 5:00 p.m. on March 20, 2015. You can contact us via email or at 206-684-5267 with any questions.

Seattle reLeaf is accepting applications for new Tree Ambassadors, to help nurture the city’s trees to grow our urban forest.

We’re looking for Tree Ambassador in two project tracks:

  • Tree Walks: Tree Walks are fun, positive community events that engage neighbors with the trees surrounding them. Tree Ambassadors develop tours to highlight interesting or significant trees in their neighborhoods and lead their walk as a public event. Check out the schedule of upcoming walks or download one of the self-guided walks here. Don’t see a walk in your neighborhood? Become a Tree Ambassador and design Seattle’s next Tree Walk! Tree Ambassadors in this track are given an introduction to tree identification and taught skills in making maps and organizing community events. After the training, staff will assist Tree Ambassadors in identifying good routes, mapping trees on that route, writing accompanying text, and putting together a public event. (Training will take place on Saturday, April 4th 9am-2pm in Ballard).
  • Landscape Renewal: Tree Ambassadors plan and organize small-scale landscape projects in residential areas. Tree Ambassadors “adopt” sites and organize work parties to weed, mulch, and activate these neighborhood green spaces. Tree Ambassadors in this track are taught basic landscaping and site design skills, how to identify and remove invasive species, proper mulching, how to safe events, and community event organizing. After the training, staff help volunteers identify an appropriate landscape to work in, develop site plans, organize community work parties, and secure tools, mulch, and other equipment. Find a site to love in your neighborhood! (Training will take place Saturday, April 25th 9am-2pm in Beacon Hill).

Apply today! You can find more details and apply at our website here: http://www.seattle.gov/trees/treeambassador.htm. Contact us with question at TreeAmbassador@Seattle.gov.

Seattle’s Human Services Department is looking for teens and young adults for its Summer Youth Internship Program. It’s open to anyone ages 14-24 who live in Seattle.

This year, through the Mayor Ed Murray’s Summer Youth at Work Initiative, the program will employ 2,000 youth and young adults this summer, double the number of jobs provided to youth last year. Eligible youth and young adults will receive paid work experience in positions at various city departments and at private sector placements based on their career interest.

Seattle youth and young adults interested in applying for summer jobs can complete the Online Applicant Information Form or pick one up at SYEP office located at 810 Third Avenue, 4th Floor, Suite 420, Seattle, WA 98104 between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. The SYEP Applicant Information Form must be completed and received online, mailed or dropped off by 5 p.m. Monday, April 13, 2015.

For students without computer access, computers are available at Seattle Public Libraries, Seattle Parks and Recreation community centers, Seattle public high schools, WorkSource Centers, and some community based organizations.

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