A news blog for Seattle's Phinney Ridge and Greenwood neighborhoods

 

Next Think & Drink: ‘We Gon’ Be Alright? The State of Race in America’

November 9th, 2016 by Doree

Humanities Washington’s next Think & Drink at Naked City Brewery is “We Gon’ Be Alright? The State of Race in America” at 7 p.m. on Monday, Nov. 21.

In 2008, a country still haunted by the ghosts of slavery chose a Black man as its leader. It was a moment filled with optimism, and considered by many a turning point for race relations.

Eight years later, things feel different. Police shootings, #BlackLivesMatter, concerns over immigrants and refugees, political correctness, and a rise in White nationalism have dominated the news. A poll from July 2016 found that 69% of Americans say that race relations are “generally bad”—the highest level of tension recorded since the Rodney King beating in 1992.

Join us for a Think & Drink event with Humanities Washington and KUOW featuring Seattle Central College professor and writer Daudi Abe and Pacific Lutheran University sociologist Teresa Ciabattari. Moderated by Humanities Washington’s Zaki Hamid.

Naked City Brewery is at 8564 Greenwood Ave. N.

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Next ‘Think & Drink’ at Naked City explores political cartooning

October 31st, 2016 by Doree

The next Humanities Washington-sponsored “Think & Drink” at Naked City Brewery is the night before the election. “Drawing Ire: Political Cartooning in Uncertain times” explores how the centuries-old tradition of political cartooning speaks to our modern, divided society.

We are drowning in memes, gifs, and YouTube clips that give us near-instant commentary and humor on political events and issues. What do political cartoons offer that other forms of expression do not, especially in this time of major political and racial divisions?

In the run-up to the 2016 election, join Humanities Washington for an exploration of how the most charged topics of the day—from racial divisions to political polarization—are being reflected through the lens of political cartooning. What should and shouldn’t be off-limits?

The event will feature Milt Priggee and A.F. Branco, both nationally syndicated cartoonists, political opposites, and friends. Both artists will also be live drawing during the event.

Think & Drink starts at 7 p.m. on Monday, Nov. 7, at Naked City Brewery and Taphouse, 8564 Greenwood Ave. N.

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Next Think & Drink asks, ‘Is our country that polarized?’

June 28th, 2016 by Doree

Humanities Washington’s next “Think & Drink” on July 12 at Naked City Brewery, 8564 Greenwood Ave. N., is titled “American Rage: Division and Anger in U.S. Politics,” and asks whether our country really is that polarized.

“This election is like no other.”

Variations of this phrase have almost become a cliché of the 2016 election season. But how else to react to the fights at rallies, filibusters, interruptions of moments of silence, calls by a major candidate for the deportation of millions, and schoolyard Twitter taunts?

We have reached the point where roughly a third of each party views the other as a “threat to the nation’s well-being,” according to the Pew Research Center, and that the political center has drifted to the left and right at an alarming rate. Forty percent of us now even disapprove of people from different political parties marrying.

Part history lesson, part discussion, part brewpub hang-out, this Think and Drink event will ask: Is it really that bad? Has U.S. politics ever been more divided and aggressive? Will it get better or worse? And is our increasingly media-saturated environment, including the rise of social media, helping or hurting our divisions and discourse?

Think & Drink begins at 7 p.m. on July 12, with WSU professors Cornell Clayton, co-editor of “Civility and Democracy in America,” and Travis Ridout, co-author of “The Persuasive Power of Campaign Advertising.” It will be moderated by KUOW’s Ross Reynolds.

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Think & Drink at Naked City May 10: Is nuclear power a solution to climate change?

May 4th, 2016 by Doree

Humanities Washington tackles “The Promise and Peril of Nuclear Energy” at its next installment of Think & Drink at Naked City Brewery, 8564 Greenwood Ave. N., at 7 p.m. Tuesday, May 10.

When talking about how to address climate change, the conversation usually turns to solar, wind, electric vehicles, even geoengineering. But what if a part of the solution has been with us for sixty years?

From “The China Syndrome” to Mr. Burns, nuclear power has inspired fear, awe, and anger. High-profile disasters like Chernobyl and Fukushima have stuck in the public consciousness. But how justified are our fears? In an era when the stability of the planet itself is threatened, is it time for MORE nuclear power, not less? Or are the risks too great?

The conversation will feature petroleum geologist and University of Washington faculty member Scott Montgomery, whose book The Shape of the New was a New York Times Notable Book for 2015; Chuck Johnson, an activist, writer, and development professional with roots in the anti-nuclear movement dating back to the 1970s; and Kathleen Flenniken, former civil engineer for the Hanford Nuclear site and Washington State Poet Laureate for 2012-2014. Flenniken’s book Plume, a meditation on the Hanford site, won the Washington State Book Award. The event will be moderated by KUOW’s environmental reporter Ashley Ahearn.

Every Think & Drink event is free and open to the public. Attendees purchase their own food and drink.

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Next ‘Think & Drink’ to discuss how climate change affects the Northwest

March 23rd, 2016 by Doree

Humanities Washington and Naked City Brewery are hosting the next “Think & Drink” on March 30 to discuss “Now or Never: Climate Change and Policymaking in the Pacific Northwest.”

Like the rest of the country, our region is addicted to cars, electricity, and consumption, and we’ve reached a turning point. Are new laws the only path toward changing our habits? Plus, we are a state divided along geographical and political lines—are our political leaders even capable of fighting climate change, or at the very least, helping us adapt to its effects?

Or is addressing climate change within the current political system simply a lost cause?
Join Seattle City Councilmember Mike O’Brien and UW Climate Impacts Group director Amy Snover for a frank conversation about what climate change means for the Pacific Northwest, and the promise and challenges of working within the system to address the most pressing issue of our time. Moderated by KUOW environmental reporter Ashley Ahearn.

Think & Drink begins at 7 p.m. next Wednesday, March 30, at Naked City Brewery, 8564 Greenwood Ave. N.

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Next Think & Drink at Naked City is ‘Seattle Skin: Being Black in a Liberal City’

November 4th, 2015 by Doree

Humanities Washington continues its fall series on difficult conversations regarding race with the next Think & Drink, called “Seattle Skin: Being Black in a Liberal City” at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, Nov. 10, at Naked City Brewery, 8564 Greenwood Ave. N.

It will be moderated by Phyllis Fletcher, managing editor of Northwest News Network. Speakers are: Megan Ming Francis, assistant professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of Washington and author of “Civil Rights and the Making of the Modern American State”; Eric Davis, sociology faculty at Bellevue College and member of the UW Consulting Alliance; Eva Abram, public speaker and Humanities Washington Speakers Bureau member; and Charles Mudede, screenwriter, author and editor at The Stranger.

“I was going to tell Bernie how racist this city is, filled with its progressives, but you did it for me,” said a #BlackLivesMatter protestor while shutting down a speech in Seattle by Bernie Sanders. She then accused the audience of “white supremacist liberalism.”

Seattle is often touted as a liberal city with progressive attitudes toward race. But how much of this talk actually translates to action? Is the protestor’s experience a common one among minorities in Seattle? Seattle is the fifth whitest city in America, with a minority population of just 33%, and this relative homogeneity often keeps differing views hidden. “Seattle Skin” will reveal the experience of being black in Seattle, and explore what the city and its culture are doing right—and what needs to be changed.

This is Humanities Washington’s fifth year of Think & Drink events, which include a moderated panel discussion with audience questions and comments. Events are free but participants buy their own drinks and food.

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Think & Drink at Naked City features conversation on policing and race

October 21st, 2015 by Doree

The next Think & Drink at Naked City Brewery is at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 27. It continues the fall series discussion of race with “Black and Blue: A Conversation on Policing and Race.”

It will be moderated by Phyllis Fletcher, managing editor of Northwest News Network. Speakers include: Megan Ming Francis, assistant professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of Washington and author of “Civil Rights and the Making of the Modern American State”; and Sergeant Sean Whitcomb, Public Affairs Director at the Seattle Police Department.

In the wake of tragedies that happened in Ferguson, NYC, and Baltimore, and others, this event will spark a conversation about the frequency with which such tragedies happen, the disparity between how different minority groups are policed, and what effective policing and community relationships should look like.

This is Humanities Washington’s fifth year of Think & Drink events, which include a moderated panel discussion with audience questions and comments. Events are free but participants buy their own drinks and food. Naked City Brewery is at 8564 Greenwood Ave. N.

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Fall ‘Think & Drink’ series at Naked City starts Sept. 29, will discuss issues of race

September 23rd, 2015 by Doree

Humanities Washington’s “Think & Drink” fall series at Greenwood’s Naked City Brewery will focus on various issues of race, including the racial disparities of mass incarceration, the relationship between police and minorities, and the experience of being black in Seattle.

Recent events—#BlackLivesMatter protestors shutting down a Bernie Sanders speech, allegations of police misconduct, and rapid gentrification—have melded with national events in Ferguson and Baltimore to shake up Seattle’s conversation about race. While the word “diversity” is often used with enthusiasm in this liberal city, harder questions are starting to be asked about Seattle’s attitude and policies toward people of color.

This is Humanities Washington’s fifth year of Think & Drink events, which include a moderated panel discussion with audience questions and comments. Events are free but participants buy their own drinks and food.

The next Think & Drink is at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, Sept. 29, at Naked City Brewery and Taphouse, 8564 Greenwood Ave. N. It is titled “America Behind Bars: Mass Incarceration and Civil Rights” and is moderated by Phyllis Fletcher, managing editor of Northwest News Network. Speakers include: Madeline Neighly, attorney on the Institutions Project at Columbia Legal Services; Merf Ehman, staff attorney with the Institutions Project at Columbia Legal Services; and Katherine Beckett, professor in the Department of Sociology and the Law, Societies, and Justice Program at the University of Washington.

At 2.2 million, the United States locks up more of its citizens than any other country in the world, and this number has increased rapidly—500% to be exact—over just the last three decades. The issue has become so urgent that it’s one of the few problems President Obama, members of Congress, and even the Koch brothers agree needs to be solved. “America Behind Bars” will address the history behind the mass incarceration epidemic, the drug war’s influence on incarceration rates, the racial disparity between the general population and those incarcerated, and the rise of the private prison system.

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Next ‘Think & Drink’ at Naked City Brewery: ‘Earth, Interrupted: Climate Change and Geo-engineering’

June 17th, 2015 by Doree

The next Humanities Washington “Think & Drink” is at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, June 23, at Naked City Brewery, 8564 Greenwood Ave. N. The topic is “Earth, Interrupted: Climate Change and Geo-engineering.”

Washington State is facing one of the worst droughts in its history, and the fire season could be unprecedented. Yet even with events like these happening with increasing frequency around the world, we still lack the political and social will to do much about them.

But there are some who say about this lack of action, “So what?” If technology has already worked so many wonders, why can’t it reduce some greenhouse emissions?

“Earth, Interrupted: Climate Change and Geo-engineering” is a moderated discussion hosted by Humanities Washington about the promise, problems, and ethical implications of using technology to intervene in the Earth’s natural systems.

Speakers: Lauren Hartzell Nichols, environmental specialist and professor of philosophy, and Thomas Ackerman, professor of atmospheric sciences at University of Washington. Moderated by Ashley Ahearn, environmental reporter at KUOW.

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