A news blog for Seattle's Phinney Ridge and Greenwood neighborhoods

 

Give Parks department your input on new park at 81st and Greenwood Saturday

June 24th, 2016 by Doree

Stop by 81st and Greenwood from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday during the Greenwood Car Show and give Seattle Parks and Recreation your input for a new park on that site. The park will cover the entire east side of Greenwood Avenue North between 81st and 82nd streets, just north of the Greenwood Library.

The strip mall and Bleachers Pub buildings are scheduled to be demolished this fall. Cascade Design Collaborative will design the park this summer and fall. Construction will take place winter through fall of 2017.

Future-park-Greenwood-81st

You can also take an online survey. They’ve even got a Pinterest page where you can post ideas.

Members of the Greenwood Community Council also will be at the future park site, giving away free temporary tattoos with the “Show Greenwood Some Love” design that was a T-shirt fundraiser after the March 9 natural gas explosion. (GCC members also will be at Sunday’s Celebrate North Seattle event in the Oak Tree Village parking lot, along with the Aurora-Licton Springs Urban Village group.)

Comments Off on Give Parks department your input on new park at 81st and Greenwood SaturdayTags: , ,

Greenwood Community Council meeting tonight on mandatory housing affordability

June 21st, 2016 by Doree

The Greenwood Community Council meets at 7 p.m. tonight (Tuesday) at the Greenwood Library, 8016 Greenwood Ave. N., to talk about the city’s proposal to implement mandatory housing affordability.

The City has released its “Director’s Report” on MHA-Residential legislation and draft ordinance. HALA focus groups have begun to meet and provide input on HALA’s community generated principles which will form part of the basis for changes to zoning, design, and planning in certain residential areas. We will review the overall MHA Program, and discuss the proposed policies and ordinance for the MHA-Residential program.

Click here for the Mandatory Housing Affordability summary.

Click here for the Mandatory Housing Affordability Director’s report.

Comments Off on Greenwood Community Council meeting tonight on mandatory housing affordabilityTags: , , ,

Greenwood Community Council meets Tuesday to learn about urban villages from nearby neighborhoods

April 18th, 2016 by Doree

The Greenwood Community Council meets at 7 p.m. Tuesday, April 19, at the Greenwood Library, 8016 Greenwood Ave. N., to learn more about nearby neighborhoods’ experiences with urban villages.

The Greenwood Community Council’s monthly meeting will be devoted to the urban village strategy, which forms the backbone of Seattle’s growth plans as outlined in the 2035 Comprehensive Plan. Guest speakers from nearby Lake City, Crown Hill, and Aurora Licton Springs will be present to share their experience engaging their community and developing a vision for potential changes to the zoning, boundaries, livability, infrastructure, and neighborhood planning in the urban village.

Comments Off on Greenwood Community Council meets Tuesday to learn about urban villages from nearby neighborhoodsTags: ,

Neighbors, business owners come together to move forward after Greenwood explosion

March 16th, 2016 by Doree

About 70 neighbors and business owners attended a special Greenwood Community Council meeting at St. John’s Egan Hall Tuesday night to learn more about the investigation into last Wednesday’s devastating natural gas explosion, and find out how the neighborhood can move forward.

Kelly Kasper, GCC Health and Safety Committee Chair, opened the meeting by saying how heartening it was to see the community rallying in response to the disaster.

“On that day it was amazing to see all these people come together, my neighbors helping other neighbors.” Having worked at the Red Cross, she said knowing your neighbors is one of the most important things you can do. “Because you never know when the next ‘fill in the blank’ is going to happen.”

Puget Sound Energy spokesman Andy Wappler said his first thought upon seeing Kasper at the scene that morning was, “Oh, it’s the Red Cross coming,” then realized, “No, actually it’s the neighborhood coming.”

Wappler spent some time explaining what to do if you think you smell natural gas.

“Leave the area and then call. Don’t stay in the building, don’t touch the light switch. Don’t touch the phone inside. Don’t try to turn off the gas yourself,” he said. “Leave, then call. You can call 911, or call us directly.”

Puget Sound Energy’s direct line for that is 1-888-225-5773. But it’s usually easier to call 911. Fire department protocol is to then call PSE.

He said embarrassment prevents many people from calling, especially in the middle of the night. Wappler said PSE has technicians working 24/7 who are happy to come check it out.

Natural gas is naturally odorless, which is why PSE adds that rotten egg smell to it. However, one woman in the audience said she can’t smell that. So Wappler explained other ways to tell, such as a loud hissing sounds, bubbles in ground water, or vegetation next to a gas meter that is inexplicably dying.

Wappler said crews finished gathering evidence from the site yesterday, finding the gas meter, piping and anything else they believe is relevant to the investigation. PSE is one part of the investigation, which is being led by the Washington Utility and Transportation Commission’s Office of Pipeline Safety. Now investigators will inspect each piece for breaks, corrosion or anything else that could affect the integrity of the system. He said our neighborhood’s piping system is not old, “So we’re confident the system here is safe.”

A man in the audience asked Wappler why the gas to the explosion site and surrounding areas wasn’t shut off sooner, saying he could see it flaring an hour after the blast. Wappler explained that although that flaring looks dramatic, it’s not particularly dangerous. PSE didn’t want to shut off gas to a wider swath of the neighborhood, because once service was restored, they would need a technician to relight pilot lights for every single home and business affected. But some homeowners would try to do it themselves, which he said is more dangerous.

Deputy Mayor Kate Joncas, who lives just a few blocks from the site, said “I was never so proud of my neighborhood as this weekend. I saw all the people coming together. I saw how the Phinney Neighborhood Association really stood up for the neighborhood.”

Left to right: Chardell Paine, PNA Membership & Events Director; Joel Darnell, Greenwood Community Council Land Use Chair; Seattle Deputy Mayor Kate Joncas; AJ Cari, Office of Economic Development; Tom Van Bronkhorst, Department of Neighborhoods.

Left to right: Chardell Paine, PNA Membership & Events Director; Joel Darnell, Greenwood Community Council Land Use Chair; Seattle Deputy Mayor Kate Joncas; AJ Cari, Office of Economic Development; Tom Van Bronkhorst, Department of Neighborhoods.

Chardell Paine of the PNA said that as of yesterday, combined fundraising totals were more than $146,000. “It’s all coming together, everyone working together,” she said. She said the PNA had convened a Greenwood Relief Fund Advisory Board, which will include business owners, community members, PNA staff and others to set guidelines to fairly and quickly get money to the people and businesses affected by the blast. That will be done in three phases: Immediate needs of residents displaced and business employees; rebuilding businesses; and the long term needs of the community.

Of 53 affected businesses that the PNA has identified, seven remain closed: the three destroyed in the blast – Neptune Coffee, Mr. Gyros and Greenwood Quick Stop; plus others that were seriously damaged, including G&O Family Cyclery; The Angry Beaver tavern; Gorditos; and Insurrection. The Greenwood Space Travel Supply Co./Greater Seattle Bureau of Fearless Ideas has relocated temporarily to the PNA. Paine said the 13 residents who lived above Gorditos have been completely displaced.

AJ Cari, from the city’s Department of Economic Development, is one of many city employees supporting business owners and anyone else affected by the explosion. The city has set up the Greenwood Recovery Office at Works Progress co-working (which is donating the space), at 115 N. 85th St., Suite 202 (upstairs). It is open from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. starting today through next Friday, March 25 (closed Sunday). Parking is available behind the building with access for those with disabilities. Phone number is 206-396-2788.

The meeting ended with audience members thanking various people, organizations and businesses that stepped up to help out in some way during the last week. One woman in the audience summed it up by saying, “The sense of the village here in Greenwood is so inspiring.”

Comments Off on Neighbors, business owners come together to move forward after Greenwood explosionTags: ,

Greenwood Community Council meeting tonight on moving forward from last week’s explosion

March 15th, 2016 by Doree

The Greenwood Community Council is hosting a meeting tonight (Tuesday) with city officials to focus on the neighborhood moving forward after last Wednesday’s natural gas explosion that destroyed three businesses and damaged more than 50 others.

The meeting starts at 7 p.m. at St. John’s Egan Hall, 120 N. 79th St., just off Greenwood Avenue, and will focus on how to prepare for and avoid future disasters such as gas leaks, and resources for recovering and rebuilding over the long term.

Here’s the agenda:

7:00 Welcome and introductions

7:10 How to stay safe from gas leaks and prepare for disaster — Speakers from Puget Sound Energy, Greenwood CC Safety/Health Committee, Q&A

7:40 Steps and resources to recover and rebuild — Speakers from Phinney Neighborhood Center, Dept.
of Neighborhoods, Office of Economic Development, Q&A

8:20 Testimonials from the audience for those who stepped up to help neighbors in a time of crisis

8:30 Adjourn

Comments Off on Greenwood Community Council meeting tonight on moving forward from last week’s explosionTags: ,

Greenwood Community Council hosting special meeting Tuesday on Greenwood explosion

March 13th, 2016 by Doree

The Greenwood Community Council’s monthly meeting this Tuesday will focus on the aftermath of Wednesday’s natural gas explosion that destroyed three businesses and damaged dozens of others.

This meeting will focus on the way forward:

  • What steps do we all need to take to prepare for and avoid future disasters such as gas leaks, and
  • What are resources for recovering and rebuilding after over the longer term.

Please join us Tuesday at 7:00 p.m. at a special location: St. John’s Egan Hall, 120 N 79th St. just off Greenwood Avenue. The program for this event is still coming together, but we have confirmed speakers from Puget Sound Energy, the Mayor’s office, Seattle’s Department of Neighborhoods and Office of Economic Development. We will also set aside time and ask for tributes for those who have stepped up this week to help the community, its businesses and their employees who have been impacted.

Comments Off on Greenwood Community Council hosting special meeting Tuesday on Greenwood explosionTags: ,

Greenwood Community Council discusses housing affordability tonight

February 16th, 2016 by Doree

The Greenwood Community Council will discuss neighborhood growth and housing affordability at 7 p.m. tonight (Tuesday) at the Greenwood Library, 8016 Greenwood Ave. N.

There is broad agreement that housing affordability is one of the most critical issues we face as our City grows and becomes more prosperous. Last year, Mayor Murray developed an action plan and community engagement is expected to ramp up this spring. In preparation for engagement on this important issue, GCC will facilitate an open and interactive community forum on growth and affordability.

The intent of the meeting is to outline Greenwood’s key affordability issues and questions, discuss opportunities, and lay the groundwork for further focused study by committees and feedback to the City. Please bring your ideas/questions and be prepared to share them with your neighbors.

The housing affordability issue is set to be discussed from about 7:20-8:30 p.m. Before that, the meeting will have a guest speaker from Seattle Neighborhood Greenways and also will discuss neighborhood speed limits.

Please note that the library’s garage closes at 8 p.m., so if you park in the garage you’ll need to move your car before then.

Comments Off on Greenwood Community Council discusses housing affordability tonightTags: , ,

Greenwood Community Council’s Transportation Committee meets Monday to discuss growth, congestion, parking

February 1st, 2016 by Doree

The Greenwood Community Council’s Transportation Committee meets at 7 p.m. tonight (Monday) at the 74th Street Ale House to discuss growth, congestion and parking. Everyone is welcome.

Committee members will use examples of increased congestion and parking issues in our neighborhood as a jumping off point to discuss city parking policies.

Comments Off on Greenwood Community Council’s Transportation Committee meets Monday to discuss growth, congestion, parkingTags: , , , ,

Greenwood Community Council meets tonight to discuss backyard cottages, transportation, land use, urban villages

January 19th, 2016 by Doree

The Greenwood Community Council meets at 7 p.m. tonight (Tuesday) at the Greenwood Library, 8016 Greenwood Ave. N. This open board meeting will cover a number of topics, with time for attendees to speak about any neighborhood issue they want the council to follow.

On the agenda are discussions about neighborhood transportation, land use, possible expansion of the Aurora-Licton Springs urban village, and engaging neighbors in discussing the city’s Housing Affordability and Livability Agenda and its Seattle 2035 Comprehensive Plan.

The council also will vote on a proposed letter to City Councilmember Mike O’Brien about pending legislation on backyard cottages. See the draft letter here, and give your input at the meeting.

Comments Off on Greenwood Community Council meets tonight to discuss backyard cottages, transportation, land use, urban villagesTags: , , , , ,